Campaign Bear’s Causes:

a wee selection

 

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Women for Independence Keir’s first campaign was during the 2014 referendum on Scottish independence from the United Kingdom. Women for Independence was one of the most remarkable, empowering grassroots organisations to emerge from the independence campaign. Women for Indy (as her friends call it) continues to campaign for social justice, for women’s equality, and for an independent Scotland.


Amnesty International I have been a volunteer activist with Amnesty for over ten years, during which time I have been a team leader, a trainer, a writer of flyers and letters and a very, very cold holder of banners. Much of my experience and training in human rights is directly attributable to Amnesty, and this has had a major impact on my work as a musicologist as well. I personally think this is Amnesty’s biggest strength as a human rights organisation and the reason that I still support it: It empowers ordinary people to do things for human rights.

For several years my Amnesty work has focused on children’s human rights. You can find out more about that work here:

Facebook: Amnesty International Children’s Human Rights

Twitter: @amnesty_kinder (Tweets mostly German with some in English; retweets in both languages


Freedom from Torture Formerly the Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torture, Freedom from Torture provides medical and therapeutic treatment to survivors and campaigns for their rights. They do truly remarkable work for their clients in the face of increasing political and financial pressure.


The Maximilian Kolbe Stiftung is a German foundation that raises funds to support survivors of Nazi persecution and their dependents, particularly in Poland and Ukraine. Many of these people live in poverty and cannot otherwise afford treatment for poor health that is often exacerbated by, or directly caused by, their treatment in the War. The foundation also helps children of these survivors, especially those born with disabilities. The foundation is named after a Polish priest who volunteered his own life in place of a fellow inmate of Auschwitz.